Shea’s girls march into national semi-finals

A RESOUNDING 8-1 win yesterday had guaranteed NSW a place in the Hockey Australia Women’s Under 21 semi-finals.
Nanjing Night Net

Orange’s Pete Shea is the assistant coach for the NSW team and he said after yesterday’s win, the side was on track.

“They’re coming along,” Shea said.

“We’ve worked on a few things. They seem to be progressing quite well. They’re heading in the right direction.”

Yesterday’s victory was the side’s fifth win after they downed Tasmania 6-0 on Saturday and ACT 2-1 on Sunday.

Last week the side downed Western Australian 2-0 and Victoria 1-0 before being edged out by Queensland 1-0.

This means NSW will feature in the semi-finals which start on Friday in Hobart.

Shea said the side had improved its attack after the initial games.

“If we’re scoring goals that indicates what’s happening up front is quite positive,” he said.

“That’s an area they’re going well in. Their ability to put the ball in the best spots for scoring opportunities is excellent at the moment.”

At the same time, their defence is also solid in conceding three goals over six games.

The NSW also includes Bathurst’s Esther Hotham and Claire McGarity and Shea said they were getting strong as the tournament goes on.

“They’re both growing and learning. They’re starting to fit into the mould of things,” Shea said.

“Esther has had a big realisation of what’s required. She’ getting in better attacking positions around the circle.

“Claire took on a more senior role against Northern Territory. She played at the back and organised things quite well.”

NSW will play their final round robin match today when they go up against semi-final contenders South Australia.

Shea was confident the side could secure another win.

“They’re heading in a good direction,” he said.

The NSW men, which includes Orange’s Nick Hill, have suffered one loss during their pool matches at their national championships in Tasmania.

On Sunday they lost 3-1 to Northern Territory but bounced back yesterday to topple Tasmania 4-1.

Today they go up against Victoria in their final round robin match before Friday’s semi-finals.

Pete Shea

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Influenza on the rise

BETTER SAFE THAN SICK: Goulburn Post journalist Lloyd Scroope receiving a flu vaccination from Dr Michael Burgess on Friday. IT starts with a sore throat, headache and loss of appetite, and culminates with muscle pain, fever and chills.
Nanjing Night Net

Rates of influenza last year more than doubled, and 2012 is said to be the same.

But don’t panic. In most cases symptoms of influenza subside and sufferers come away unscathed.

The solution: consult a doctor if symptoms persist or you are concerned.

Practice good hygiene and wait it out. That’s the advice of general practitioner Dr Michael Burgess, whose words of wisdom come at the height of flu season.

More than 2300 people have been diagnosed in New South Wales alone this year. Experts say it’s only the beginning, with thousands more cases going undiagnosed.

But it’s not all bad news. Every year come March through May, influenza vaccinations are distributed to the public through medical clinics and hospitals nationally.

Missed your vaccination? Don’t worry, it’s not too late. Immunisations are still available, and can be administered free of charge from all local health centres to people with chronic illnesses (like diabetes), pregnancy, those over the age of 65 and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

For healthy people under the age of 65, the vaccination is also available for a small fee. It’s reported to be 70–90 per cent effective.

“I think it gives you reasonable protection,” Dr Burgess, a GP at McKell Medical Clinic, said.

“Obviously if the flu vaccine doesn’t match a particular strain, it may be ineffective. But in most cases, it’s effective.”

Although immunisation is readily available to all, it’s those over the age 65 who best take advantage of the service.

Dr Burgess countered misconceptions that the vaccines are often met with side effects, including dizziness, irritability, swelling and fever.

“The majority of patients over the age of 65 would get vaccinated,” he said.

“There a few people who say they had a reaction to it, but they would be in the minority.”

While influenza can strike at any time, it’s prone to rearing its head during the winter months.

“During winter, people are in closer proximity, houses are less ventilated; sneezing and coughing produce airborne droplets that carry the flu virus,” Dr Burgess said.

Symptomatic treatment for those suffering with the flu is the best way to approach the virus once it’s contracted. Dr Burgess recommends Paracetamol, nasal drops and cough mixture as well as rest.

The main cure of influenza, however, is simple. Time.

Much of the spread can be attributed to the attitudes of working Australians, Influenza Special Group director and the University of Sydney immunisation expert, Professor Robert Booy says.

“So many Australians feel the need to soldier on when sick, a mindset that is not only risking their health, but potentially their lives,” he said.

“We’re encouraging people to visit their doctor within the first 48 hours of noticing symptoms because that’s when antivirals are effective as they reduce the time for which you are ill, and also reduce the chance of something more severe developing, like a secondary infection.”

Those infected are urged to be mindful of others when visiting their GP. Masks are available free-of-charge at the reception of McKell Medical Clinic.

More information about influenza, the vaccine and treatment is available online at www.flusmart.org.au.

Follow @bmurphy92

!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=”//platform.twitter南京夜网/widgets.js”;fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,”script”,”twitter-wjs”);

Follow @LloydScroope

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Making the right move

THIS week, I realised I have been back in Goulburn for 10 years.
Nanjing Night Net

A decade ago, I decided to leave Canberra for good and return to my hometown of Goulburn.

I don’t know why I had this overwhelming desire to move back here then. I wanted to reconnect with my family. My parents were getting old. I wanted a simpler lifestyle. I was starting to seriously pursue my writing (plays and stories) and I felt I needed the “mental space” of a country town to do this.

I had a partner at the time who was supportive of the move, though we didn’t have kids then. I was sick of paying exorbitant Canberra rents to live in small houses with no character, especially when I knew I could possibly buy an old house with character and charm here – for the same money.

I don’t really know what it was, but I had an instinct that I wanted to return “home” and it took over. It was not a logical thing.

Aboriginal Elders I have spoken to talk about the need to “return to country” to heal the spirit. I think this is a universal thing. We are all attached to the landscape where we have grown up.

These childhood landscapes permeate out dreams. They are in our blood, part of who we are.

After 10 years in the public service in Canberra I had a ‘mid-life crisis’. My first marriage had busted up and my job felt meaningless and soul-destroying.

I found myself wandering around Civic most lunch times feeling like a ghost – like I was out of my body watching all of the other ghosts walk past me. What was I doing? Where was I going?

I was losing my mind. I knew I needed my childhood landscape back, that I needed to “change the backdrop,” that I needed to “re-connect”. I somehow “knew” that would help heal me.

So I boldly did it. I moved back. At first it was tough. I commuted to my job daily in Canberra for three months before I got a job at the Goulburn Post in September, 2002. But by that stage, I was going mad from the long hours of commuting each day.

Though I was exhausted most days, I stuck it out – but I was starting to wonder whether I had made the right decision – so landing the job at the Goulburn Post was a sign that I had made the right move.

As I walked around the city on the weekend, I realised again what a beautiful city it is. I never tired of the grandeur of the old buildings here. They really knew how to build things once. They cared about it and it shows.

I never tire of the views over the city from Verner St hill or Rocky Hill. I love the local characters in this city, even if they do “bail you up” in the street to have a yarn. The people here have real humour and warmth.

I am raising a family here now. I am making a go of it. Life gets a bit complicated at times (yes, even in a country town) but I am contributing. I am giving back. I am happy. It was the right move.

EMAIL:

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Learning the parent teacher night lingo

IT’S July already, and that means once again it is parent teacher interview season.
Nanjing Night Net

Parents can rejoice in the moment that note comes home next week with the little box checked, interview required – yes.

With this many children (half a dozen plus one, in case you’re just getting to know me), I am fast becoming a professional at the art of the parent teacher interview.

I’m fairly sure I’m every teacher’s nightmare, especially when I pull out an iPad full of my notes and questions, but that is a whole other story for next time.

What parents of first time kindergarten kids may not realise, is that teachers have a finely tuned turn of phrase. A language, if you’ll humour me, that they have crafted especially for use on parents. I think it’s a subject in their bachelor of education; ‘How to talk to parents so they won’t throw a chalk duster at you 101’.

Carefully worded statements with a hint of praise will be used in place of saying something negative about your child. These are questions in disguise, and let’s face it, why have you been summoned to the school on a cold winter’s evening?

If you think it’s to be showered with praise about your “model” child, then this probably isn’t going to be your night. Prepare for an evening of awkward explanations and uncomfortable silences, as you figure out what to say next. Feeling like it’s you who is in trouble and have been sent to the principal’s office, and wondering if our own parents felt the same way.

While I don’t have the answers, I believe can help parents new to this with some translation of the parent teacher interview language for you.

Here are a few examples:

“What is he like at home?” translates to; How DO you live with him?

“He is full of energy” – tells you that the teacher simply cannot keep your child in their seat.

“He has interesting tastes” – does not mean you may have an artist on your hands, it means that glue, glitter, sand, the class guinea pig’s food and paint have all been taste-tested by your child.

“She is very creative, and we need to find a way to channel that into something” – for heaven’s sake buy your child some colouring books to do at home, this drawing unicorns on every picture she comes across in any book is getting expensive. The class has been banned from the library.

“She needs to be more focussed on her class work” – when not drawing on library books, she is staring out the window, quite probably daydreaming about drawing horns on ponies.

“We enjoy having him in the class” – your child is more fun to watch in action than the circus.

“He is a very affectionate little boy” – we need to discuss boundaries, and also some parents outside may wish to talk to you.

Lastly there is the phrase “Thanks for coming, it’s lovely to meet you” – yes you made it to the interview and wow you look much more together than we thought you would, especially given what we see from your progeny each day.

Now all you have to do now is maintain the facade, and the illusion is complete.

EMAIL:

Follow @CandysFamily

None

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

David’s Valiant bash to help the children

CAR 812: David Blissett’s 1966 VC Valiant station wagon that was purchased from a friend especially for the event.WITH 14 charity bashes under his belt, Marulan’s David Blissett is certainly no stranger to driving through the outback for a good cause.
Nanjing Night Net

This year will be his fifth year competing in one of Australia’s most exciting and successful charity motoring events, the NSW Variety Bash.

Joined by team mates Gary Shepherd, Gary’s wife Sharon, and friend Mel Hughes, the crew will travel 4202km on a nine day road trip adventure along with 37 other like-minded adventurers in order to raise money for Variety, the children’s charity.

This year’s Bash is set to make its departure from Balmain on Sunday, August 19.

The Variety Bash is not merely a race, but rather a drive through the outback with other fund raisers driving miles for the smiles, appreciating areas of Australia they may not have otherwise experienced while simultaneously raising money to support kids in need.

“We all do the Bash for various reasons, but primarily we do it because we recognise the invaluable work that Variety does with the money the Bash raises,” Mr Blissett said.

“We also enjoy the reaction of the kids at the various schools that we go to and the positive vibe that it sends through the communities that we visit along the Bash route.”

In keeping with the Bash rules of driving pre-1974 vehicles, the team will be travelling as Car 812 in a 1966 VC Valiant station wagon that was purchased from a friend especially for the event.

“Since owning the vehicle I have rebuilt and replaced the majority of the car’s parts, sometimes twice,” Mr Blissett said.

“It’s virtually a brand new 46-year-old car.

“I hate to think what I have spent on it over the years but as I don’t smoke, drink or gamble I see it as my ‘vice’. I tell my wife that Val (our nickname for the car) is my mistress, and she just laughs.”

The team will be among more than 100 other elaborately decorated vehicles in the quirky convoy that is set to take off on August 19 and journey across the country to Bamaga, a town near the northern tip of Cape York.

Along the way, the colourful cavalcade will detour through some of NSW’s most remote areas, including Merriwa and Mungindi, as well as some of Queensland’s most iconic outback towns such as Archer River and Charters Towers so that the participants can see the sights, have fun, and help out the local community, all in the name of raising funds for Variety.

“The way in which the event helps these small towns was particularly evident in the worst years of the drought when the Bash gave these struggling communities not only an economic boost but a boost to the morale of the people living there,” Mr Blissett said.

“We obviously enjoy the camaraderie of the people on the Bash and seeing the amazing country we get to travel through.”

A donation of $8500 to Variety, the children’s charity is required to take part in the Variety Bash, with any amount raised above able to be used for the purpose of bribing and corrupting officials during the event.

Participants of the Bash are encouraged to begin fundraising in advance of the event and to get their family, friends and work colleagues involved.

While there are no prizes for ‘winning’ as such, trophies are instead rewarded for the highest fundraisers.

To date, Mr Blissett and his team have raised an impressive $17,000 through raffles and charity auctions as well as help from friends, the community, and Elders Agricultural.

It is the combined sense of charity, adventure and friendship that transpires during the Variety Bash that keeps the team coming back each year. “This year we’re really looking forward to heading up to Cape York,” Mr Blissett said.

“This is an area I have wanted to visit but never had the opportunity. It’s also a great chance to escape the mundane of everyday life and although we have to abide by the rules of society, out in the bush you feel as though ‘big brother’ does not have the same strangle hold over you.

“There’s a nice sense of freedom that many do not have in their everyday lives.”

Last year, more than 134 vehicles took part in the event, raising more than $1.82 million net, and this year even more are expected to compete.

The Variety Bash was created by businessman and philanthropist Dick Smith in June 1985 and since then has raised more than $115 million for Variety, The Children’s Charity.

Donations can be made to Car 812 at http://2012nswbalmaintobam aga.gofundraise南京夜网.au/page /NSWCar_812.

Follow @GoulburnPost

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Diabetes: a killer on the rise

THIS week is Diabetes Awareness Week and a campaign is underway to inform the public.
Nanjing Night Net

Diabetes is Australia’s fastest growing chronic disease, with one person being diagnosed every five minutes, and 290 Australians developing it every day.

The number of people contracting Type Two diabetes in NSW has increased by 10 per cent in past decade but that number is expected to double over the next four years.

By 2016, the disease is expected to become the leading cause of illness and premature death in Australia.

The total financial cost of Type Two diabetes to the Australian economy is estimated at $10.3 billion a year.

However, up to 60pc of cases can be prevented. Australian Diabetes Council research shows that many regional areas, including Goulburn Mulwaree, have higher risk rates of cardiovascular disease, which is a contributing factor.

Similarly, those from lower socio-economic backgrounds are also more likely to develop the disease.

There are a number of ways to reduce the risk of developing Type Two diabetes, including not smoking, exercising for 30 minutes a day and maintaining a healthy weight and diet.

The Goulburn Diabetes Support Group meets on the first Thursday of every month at 11.30am at the Goulburn Soldiers Club. If you would like to attend contact coordinator Gary Easterby on 4827 3913.

To learn more about the disease or to make a donation visit www.australiandiabetescouncil南京夜网 or call the toll-free number on 1300 324 238.

Follow @squireant

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New native veg act ‘bureaucracy gone mad’

STAKE IN VEGIE: OEH policy officer Rob Nicholl addresses the gathering at the native vegetation information session at Goulburn Soldiers Club on Thursday.The NSW Government Office of Environment and Heritage held a native vegetation information session at the Soldiers Club yesterday.
Nanjing Night Net

But all it did was fuel the frustrations of those who will be impacted most by the revised legislation.

A small group of farmers, agronomists and councillors attended the information session with the aim of finding out more about the changes to the Native Vegetation Regulation, set to launch later this year.

The State Government is reviewing the regulation to ensure it allows farmers to manage their land, while also protecting the natural resources and environment upon which sustainable agriculture and forestry are based.

One of the many objectives of the meeting was to reduce the amount of red tape that landholders need to sort through to get approval.

Currently landholders require approval under what is known as a Property Vegetation Plan for a range of land-clearing activities. Under these proposed changes, landholders will be able to clear for a range of activities without needing approval from their local Catchment Management Authority.

“The general feeling is that we still have a lot of frustrations with the regulations,” Bungonia farmer Bill Dobbie told the Post.

“It’s all well and good to be addressing these regulations to us, but I feel that it either needs to be repealed altogether, or even more thoroughly reviewed.

“The whole Act is so complex. I honestly feel that it’s a waste of time trying to understand it all.

“I think a lot of people have been let down by the current Liberal (State) Government, who promised to totally change the Act, but that actually they appear to be standing back and doing absolutely nothing to help.”

Crookwell cattle farmer John Carter felt that farmers were being told what they could and couldn’t do.

“There were only eight farmers here, out of the possible 3000 to 4000 in the whole Southern area, which represents only a tiny minority,” he said.

“The Office of Environment and Heritage think that they can tell farmers who have been living off this land for nearly 180 years how to regulate their land use.

“The only reason there was such a small number of farmers here today is because most farmers wouldn’t know that such a complex Act is in existence. It’s purely an example of bureaucracy gone mad.”

The Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) felt that the overall tone of the meeting was one of frank and fair discussion about the regulations.

“The review process is underway and the draft regulation is currently on exhibition,” Office of Environment and Heritage’s Tom Grosskopf said.

“So far, we’ve held 16 public forums (including two today at Goulburn and Inverell) about the draft regulation, with more to follow over the next week or so.

“We’ve had good attendance at a wide range of meetings across the state. We’re encouraging people to make comments on the draft regulation,”

The OEH is encouraging people to make comments on the draft regulation. The closing date for submissions is August 24. More information can be found at: www.environment.nsw.gov.au/vegetation/ReviewofNVRegulations.htm.

Follow @squireant

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Occupants lucky

ON SCENE: Skid marks were apparent on the Federal Highway south of Goulburn where a car careered off the road and slammed into a tree. The two occupants sustained minor injuries.TWO people escaped serious injury yesterday when a vehicle veered off the Federal Highway and hit a tree.
Nanjing Night Net

The Ford station wagon was travelling south in lane two when for unknown reasons it veered left and hit an Armco railing 15km from Goulburn, police said.

The car spun and skidded about 40 metres before descending a slight, boggy embankment and slamming backwards into a tree. The tree snapped as a result.

The male and female occupants were able to walk free but were taken to Goulburn Base Hospital with minor injuries.

Parkesbourne Rural Fire Brigade attended the accident as a precaution. Investigations are continuing.

Follow @GoulburnPost

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Coles workers protest the ‘flak’

GOING NOWHERE: work ground to a halt at the Coles Distribution Centre on Wednesday when staff say they were stood down by management following industrial actions in Melbourne. The company, however, says employees walked off the job in protest.FAIR Work Australia has granted Coles orders to prevent distribution centre staff from taking unprotected industrial action following a dispute at the Goulburn warehouse this week.
Nanjing Night Net

The National Union of Workers (NUW) said about local 200 employees were stood down by the retail corporate on Wednesday morning because they raised concerns about the “flak” from the Somerton warehouse near Melbourne.

But Coles says 76 Goulburn staff had “walked off the job” in sympathy for 600 Somerton staff who took part in industrial action on Tuesday.

Goulburn staff say the disruption meant they were forced to deal with 50,000 containers of unprocessed stock that was supposed to be coming from Somerton via truck early on Wednesday morning.

“The trouble at the Goulburn distribution centre wasn’t strike action, but that the morning shift workers were sent home for four hours (Wednesday) pending further negotiations, and had their pay docked accordingly,” NUW spokesman Mark Ptolemy said.

“The workers had also raised concerns about having to take all the flak from the Somerton centre, but they are in united in solidarity with the Melbourne guys, and feel that they shouldn’t have to cop it either.”

Mr Ptolemy also expressed that Coles had gone to extraordinary lengths to keep the workers busy with the extra workload.

“Apparently Coles has made an application with Fair Work Australia in a ruling this afternoon (Wednesday) to stop them from launching any strike action for up to three weeks.

“We believe that Coles does not need to be so heavy- handed and aggressive when negotiating these terms to their workers.

Coles centre ups the ante

“Whether this is an issue of greed or another ulterior motive by Coles to put the guys in Victoria off, I suppose we’ll never know.

“So this knee-jerk reaction to send the workers home for 4 hours this morning, we feel was ‘bunged on’ by Coles themselves,” he said.

Mr Ptolemy also stated that Coles needs to take the more ‘softly, softly’ approach when negotiating with their employees.

“Rather than trying to bully them in to working harder, Coles management should try to be less aggressive and use more conciliatory tactics,” he said.

About 400 packing and storing staff at the regional NSW centre on Wednesday were understood to have refused to take over shipping work that would normally have been done at the supermarket’s distribution centre in Melbourne.

But Coles spokesperson Jim Cooper said: “This morning (Wednesday) at 8am, 76 workers at the Coles Goulburn distribution centre walked off the job, despite being advised that this would constitute unprotected industrial action,” he said.

“The team members subsequently returned to work at 12.30pm, and the distribution centre has continued to operate normally throughout the day,” he said.

“This afternoon (Wednesday) Fair Work Australia has granted orders to prevent any further unprotected industrial action at key Coles distribution centre sites in NSW.”

Follow @squireant

None

<#start#>

None

/* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */

var disqus_shortname = ‘goulburnpost’; // required: replace example with your forum shortname

/* * * DON’T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */

(function() {

var dsq = document.createElement(‘script’); dsq.type = ‘text/javascript’; dsq.async = true;

dsq.src = ‘http://’ + disqus_shortname + ‘.disqus南京夜网/embed.js’;

(document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0] || document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(dsq);

})();

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Local through and through

FOCUSED: Crookwell born Jason Shepherd is standing for Goulburn Mulwaree Council on a platform of sustainable development, jobs, opportunity and community.Jason Shepherd runs for council – and Hume too?
Nanjing Night Net

A group, partially comprising Labor Party members, is considering running a ticket at the upcoming council election.

But one of its members, Jason Shepherd, who’s also not ruling out a tilt at Hume, insists they’ll be independent.

He and two other possible candidates, former Labor candidate for Hume Robin Saville and cellist Laszlo Strasser, distributed leaflets at last Saturday’s markets.

“We’re considering running for Goulburn Mulwaree Shire (sic) Council and we want to hear from locals what is important to you,” the pamphlet stated.

All three men attended the most recent council meeting. Mr Strasser has twice stood unsuccessfully for Goulburn Mulwaree.

But Mr Shepherd, who’s been a member of the Labor Party for 18 years, told the Post a group ticket was far from assured. If it eventuated, it would include a broad base of community members.

“I really think Council doesn’t need the drama of state and federal politics,” he said.

“It is about getting things done rather than being associated with that drama.”

Mr Shepherd said he hadn’t made up his mind about standing for Hume.

Meantime, the Crookwell product is focusing on his independent campaign for the September 8 elections.

He described himself as a “local boy through and through”.

Mr Shepherd was born in Crookwell, grew up in Binda and has worked as a mechanical engineer and project manager in southeast Asia and many other parts of the world. These days he’s employed with Northrop Consulting Engineers in Canberra, commuting from his Goulburn home, but also regularly working from home.

If elected to Council he would scale back his commitments.

“I’ve always wanted to run for Council. It is about giving back to the community,” Mr Shepherd said.

“When I left school I had to leave town to get an education and afterwards, there weren’t too many jobs in mechanical engineering.

“But about three years ago I looked for the opportunity to come back to Goulburn.”

Now the 41-year-old, wife Nina and two young children are firmly ensconced in the city.

The candidate lists jobs, opportunity and community as his main priorities. Mr Shepherd advocates a balance between development and ensuring adequate services and amenities for residents.

“We need to make it easier for those who have left to come back and work in their chosen fields,” Mr Shepherd said.

“Development, heritage and sustainability can be achieved hand in hand within a budget that doesn’t push struggling families even further to the kerb.

“I know because I do this sort of work everyday and when done right, the community is the winner.”

A decision on the Marketplace redevelopment will fall on the new council.

Mr Shepherd said he wasn’t privy to all information but he’d like to explore options to keep Verner St open rather than jeopardise heritage and the city’s unique street grid pattern.

Uniting community through the monthly markets and a neighbourhood centre acting as a one-stop-shop for groups, information and volunteers are also on his agenda.

He’s keen to snare more specialist doctors here, saving the elderly the expense and stress of travelling to Canberra.

“There is (also) a need to provide a permanent Life Long Learning Centre for older people that will empower them to keep active, out of care and in the community,” Mr Shepherd said.

“There are thousands of over 80s and baby boomers in our community; we need to make sure we care for those valuable and experienced resources.”

He nominated the Sydney Rd intersection near the Masonic Lodge for treatment, ensuring safe passage for the elderly. He supports the wetlands project, native tree planting and solar initiatives.

Mr Shepherd’s promising a fresh set of eyes and the experience of living and working around the world. He says if the ticket eventuates, there are advantages in having “like-minded” individuals on Council.

“It’s easier to have a voice and to get things done if the need arises but that doesn’t mean we will always vote the same way.”

Nominations for the elections open on July 30 and close on August 8.

Follow @LouThrower

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.